Fresh from the Trash Bin

When I first posted this blog on November 13, 2014 I worried that the subject matter might turn viewers off.  Let’s face it.  Tax law is something few people want to read about.  How boring.  No vampires.  No zombies.

zombies21

We’re from the IRS!

Well, if that’s the way you think then you’ve never been in trouble with the IRS. Not knowing your liabilities, right or wrong, under tax law can result in a truckload of vampires arriving at your front door, IRS agents whose bonuses and raises are dependent on how much blood they suck from a delinquent taxpayer.  Followed by the courts of last appeal whose zombie lawyers blindly follow the tax code and whose senses of sight and hearing are long dead.  Good luck finding a living human in the muck of legal marshland.

After much reflection, I’ve pulled it from the trash, made a few changes to the vitriolic tone and am reposting. Here t’is – fresh from the trash bin…

If you ever find yourself divorcing a con man, there’s just one way of escaping a shared tax debt without providing your death certificate or going to prison and that is to prove you were too stupid and dimwitted to understand the tax forms you signed. If

The ideal innocent Spouse Candidate

The ideal innocent Spouse Candidate

you can’t prove you’re a moron,  you will be charged with willful avoidance.

Willful Avoidance means, in brief, that it is your duty as a prudent taxpayer to fully understand tax returns you have signed.  It doesn’t matter if you’re married to a billionaire with more properties than you can count, Swiss bank accounts, and an office full of tax accountants.  If he (or she) disappears owing taxes, the IRS will be after you, particularly if you’re living in the primary residence.  And you can’t claim you knew nothing; they will harass you continually as each day brings rising penalties and interest on your debt until it’s so ridiculously inflated that one lifetime alone will not be enough get out from underneath.  Trust me, this is an awful feeling.

th-2For this reason I believe a taxman should be in attendance at all wedding ceremonies and that the following should be written into the vows:

Preacher:  “According to IRS Code, Section 40.01(c), Article 99, Rev. Proc. 2013-2014, do you, Chester Morton, promise to provide your wife with an audited set of financial records every quarter.” 

Groom: “I do.

Preacher:  “And do you, Sally Murgatory, promise to fulfill your duty to the IRS as a prudent taxpayer, by scrutinizing all financial records and tax returns with the help of CPA and refusing to sign anything you do not completely understand?”

brideIf the bride objects thusly: “Golly Preacher Man, shouldn’t I be obeying my man and making him feel like a king in his castle?”

The taxman in attendance must interject:  “To blindly obey your husband constitutes Willful Avoidance, a crime in the eyes of the IRS!”

Granted it would probably take some of the romance out of a wedding to have a taxman standing between the bride and groom, but it needs to be done!  Too much of that honoring and obeying is what leads to willful avoidance and you don’t want to go there.

Here is another fact about marriage and tax law which should be made clear to both bride and groom:  Even if you don’t work, even if you stay home to take care of the children, no spouse has the right to say the following:

“It’s my money.  I made it and I can do what I want with it!”

MrToadVehicleWRONG!  In the eyes of the tax man, both spouses are equally responsible for paying taxes on any money and or property brought into a marriage.  State laws may differ but I wouldn’t bet the bank on it.

Okay, I’ve painted a pretty dire picture.  The IRS has provided a way out of an unfair tax debt.  It’s not an easy road but it can be done.  Next time:  Innocent Spouse Relief for Dummies.

For your listening enjoyment, The Tax Man by George Harrison

***Images and cartoons are from Bing.com

8 thoughts on “Fresh from the Trash Bin

  1. Pingback: Off to See the Wizard | JT Twissel

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